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November 14th, 2017


FROM THE PUBLISHER

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COMPANION

  • Opportunities for veterinarians expected to rise significantly 
  • Banfield Pet Hospital® launches Banfield Veterinary Student Debt Relief Pilot Program
  • Florida bill could prohibit people convicted of abusing animals from owning pets 
  • FDA withdrawing draft Guidance for Compounding Animal Drugs from Bulk Drug Substances
  • VetCell Therapeutics and Western University seek allogeneic stem cell treatment for canine atopic dermatitis

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LIVESTOCK

  • The WHO issues guidance on antibiotics use in livestock
  • USDA scientist: WHO guidelines not supported by ‘sound science’
  • Top dairy cooperative rebrands to give dairy farmers an Edge
  • Final rule on organic livestock and poultry practices delayed
  • Oklahoma beef checkoff referendum voted down

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PRODUCTS TO WATCH

  • Ceva Animal Health introduces FELISCRATCH by FELIWAY™

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Sales

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FROM THE PUBLISHER

Vet-Advantage announces new SoundBytes now available

Vet-Advantage Industry Calendar: November 2017  

Current promotions, conferences, events, important dates and more... Click Here to View.

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Price Index Update

Quote of the Week

“Feedback is the breakfast of champions.” – Ken Blanchard  

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COMPANION

Opportunities for veterinarians expected to rise significantly 
A recent CNBC report highlighted that for aspiring veterinarians, demand is set to rise significantly in the next 10 years. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, opportunities for veterinarians are set to climb by some 18 percent through 2026, while roles for vet technicians will rise by 20 percent in the same time frame. Salaries can reach into the high six-figures, depending on role and area of practice. And demand is so high that vet students often have two job offers when they graduate. There aren't enough slots in U.S. vet schools to accommodate all applicants. Dr. Joan Hendricks, dean of the UPenn's vet school, said there are about 4,000 spots for vet students across the country annually. UPenn now has 125 slots for students, up from 110, and the application process is highly competitive because the school can get up to 15 times more applicants than available slots. Read the full article at: https://www.cnbc.com/2017/11/03/for-aspiring-vets-jobs-are-aplenty-demand-set-to-rise-18-percent-in-10-years.html/

Banfield Pet Hospital® launches Banfield Veterinary Student Debt Relief Pilot Program
Banfield Pet Hospital® recently unveiled the Banfield Veterinary Student Debt Relief Pilot Program. Marking the latest development in the practice’s commitment to supporting its associates’ financial well-being, Banfield is set to launch a new debt relief program for its veterinarians in December 2017. “High levels of veterinary student debt are plaguing the industry, and Banfield is committed to helping veterinarians address this significant burden,” said Dr. Daniel Aja, senior vice president & chief medical officer, Banfield Pet Hospital. “As we continue to dedicate ourselves to continuous improvement as a practice, we’re investing in the new Banfield Veterinary Student Debt Relief Pilot Program to support our doctors first and foremost – but also set the bar for the veterinary profession to help address this industry-wide issue.” The new Banfield Veterinary Student Debt Relief Pilot Program for eligible doctors will include three main elements: 1. A low-interest refinancing option with supplementary .25% interest-rate reduction from a third party financial institution; 2. A monthly student-loan contribution of $150 paid by Banfield directly on qualifying student loans; 3. A one-time $2,500 payment for each qualifying Banfield student program in which the doctor participates prior to graduating.

Florida bill could prohibit people convicted of abusing animals from owning pets 
According to the Daytona Beach News, a bill called “Ponce’s Law” would put more bite into Florida’s animal cruelty cases by allowing judges to prohibit people convicted of abusing animals from owning pets and giving prosecutors more leverage in the cases, said state Rep. Tom Leek, who introduced the bill. The bill is named in honor of Ponce, a Labrador retriever puppy found beaten to death in the Ponce Inlet backyard of Travis Archer earlier this year.

FDA withdrawing draft Guidance for Compounding Animal Drugs from Bulk Drug Substances
According to TheHorse.com, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced Nov. 7 that it is withdrawing draft Guidance for Industry #230, “Compounding Animal Drugs from Bulk Drug Substances,” in order to clarify that the agency does not plan to finalize the current draft, but instead intends to issue a new draft for public comment next year. The draft guidance issued in May 2015 proposed conditions under which the FDA generally would not intend to take action against the compounding of animal drugs from bulk drug substances, with the goal of making such animal drugs available for patient care without jeopardizing the safety of animals and humans or compromising the animal drug approval process. Current law does not permit compounding of animal drugs from bulk drug substances, but the FDA recognizes that there are circumstances where there is no approved drug that can be used or modified through compounding to treat a particular animal with a particular condition. In those limited situations, an animal drug compounded from bulk drug substances might be an appropriate treatment option.

VetCell Therapeutics and Western University seek allogeneic stem cell treatment for canine atopic dermatitis
VetCell Therapeutics, a pet-focused cell therapy division of PrimeGen Biotech, announced that it has entered into a collaborative clinical study with Western University of Health Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, one of only two esteemed veterinary programs in California, to study the efficacy and safety of treating canine atopic dermatitis (AD) with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The goal of this collaborative research project is to determine if allogeneic MSCs can serve as a safe, effective and more extended treatment alternative to corticosteroids and other medical strategies for treating canine AD, according to a release. The project will be led by the principal investigators Dr. Jijun Hao, PhD, Assistant Professor, and Dr. Gagandeep Kaur, DVM, PhD, a Veterinarian and Assistant Professor, both at Western University of Health Sciences. VetCell Therapeutics will supply GMP allogeneic MSCs for the study.

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LIVESTOCK

The WHO issues guidance on antibiotics use in livestock
According to NPR, the World Health Organization, worried about an increasing epidemic of drug-resistant infections, has thrown its weight behind the campaign to cut the use of antibiotics in pigs, chickens and cattle that are raised for their meat. The WHO is calling on governments to follow the example of Denmark and the Netherlands, which have banned the use of these drugs to make animals grow faster, or simply to protect healthy animals from getting sick. The "over-use and misuse of antimicrobials" has occurred both in human medicine and on farms, says Marc Sprenger, a scientist at WHO. But in sheer quantity, the amount of antibiotics used on farms far exceeds what's used to treat people in many countries, including in the U.S. "It's very important that we reduce use in human medicine and in animal production," says Kazuaki Miyagishima, director of the Department of Food Safety at the WHO. The WHO has now issued its first formal guidelines for how these drugs should be used on farms. According to these guidelines, antibiotics cannot be used to promote faster growth or merely to prevent disease in healthy animals. The WHO called on veterinarians to avoid the use of antibiotics that are most critical in human health. The agency also wants governments to ban the use in animals of any new antibiotics that scientists may discover in the future.

USDA scientist: WHO guidelines not supported by ‘sound science’
The World Health Organization, in direct conflict with U.S. policy, released recommendations regarding the use of antibiotics in agriculture, according to a Drover’s CattleNetwork report. The WHO’s new guidelines are aimed at curbing the rise of global antibiotic resistance, and WHO asks the world’s farmers to help by changing the way they raise their animals. “The WHO guidelines are not in alignment with U.S. policy and are not supported by sound science,” said Dr. Chavonda Jacobs-Young, USDA Acting Chief Scientist. “The recommendations erroneously conflate disease prevention with growth promotion in animals." Read more at: https://www.drovers.com/article/who-guidelines-antibiotics-conflict-science-usda-says

Top dairy cooperative rebrands to give dairy farmers an Edge
Milk is getting a new voice in America’s Heartland, according to a release. Meet Edge, the dairy farmer cooperative, formerly known as the Dairy Business Milk Marketing Cooperative, taking a fresh approach to representing its members. “Edge is now representative of the growth and evolution our cooperative has undergone over the past seven years. It’s also a promise of the future,” says John Pagel, a Wisconsin dairy farmer and president of Edge. “We put our members at the forefront of the discussions, giving dairy farmers a voice in matters critical to their businesses and their communities.” As Dairy Business Milk Marketing Cooperative, the organization led a cost reduction for farmers in verification co-ops throughout the market and broke away from traditional bloc voting by giving each member a vote. The cooperative also elevated the voice of farmers in federal policy discussions about global markets, supply management, immigration reform and other issues. Now with nearly 800 members from farms of all sizes in nine states, the co-op is one of the top in the country for milk volume, sitting at No. 5 on the Hoard’s Dairyman Top 50 list.

Final rule on organic livestock and poultry practices delayed
According to Feedstuffs, the Trump Administration again decided to delay the effective date of the final rule on organic livestock and poultry practices that was published in the final hours of the Obama Administration. The first delay came in February 2017, followed by another delay in May. The latest slowdown has the agency waiting to evaluate the rule until May 14, 2018. The Organic Livestock & Poultry Practices (OLPP) rule, initially proposed in April 2016, adds new provisions for livestock handling and transport for slaughter and avian living conditions and expands and clarifies existing requirements covering livestock care and production practices. Although larger organic interests like the Organic Trade Assn. (OTA) supported the initial rule release, many commodity groups such as the National Pork Producers Council, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Assn. and even larger organic businesses voiced opposition about the stipulations and costly regulations without providing animal welfare benefits. The latest delay would have given the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) 180 days – until Nov. 14, 2017 – to evaluate comments on whether USDA should implement the rule, suspend the rule indefinitely, delay the rule or withdraw the rule.

Oklahoma beef checkoff referendum voted down
According to BEEF Magazine, after a bitter and contentious pre-vote battle, the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry announced on Wednesday, Nov. 9 that the Oklahoma beef checkoff referendum was voted down, with 2,506 beef producers voting no and 1,998 voting yes. Officials with the Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association (OCA), which supported the effort to establish a state-run beef checkoff in addition to the national $1-per-head checkoff, were disappointed.

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PRODUCTS TO WATCH

Ceva Animal Health introduces FELISCRATCH by FELIWAY™
Veterinarians have a new solution to help cats scratch in places which won’t drive their owner crazy – preventing the request for declaw procedures, improving feline welfare and cutting down on cat relinquishments, according to a Ceva Animal Health release. The new, one-of-a-kind product, FELISCRATCH by FELIWAY™, is clinically proven to stop and prevent both vertical and horizontal destructive scratching in the home. It does this by redirecting the cat to scratch his or her scratching post – not the couches and curtains. In clinical studies, FELISCRATCH® attracted more than 80 percent of cats to use their scratching posts within the first week of use. More than 90 percent of cats never started destructive scratching when adopted into a new home using FELISCRATCH®.

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SALES

Pat Malone’s sales tip of the week

Comparatives - "There is always someone faster, richer or more talented than you, but no one better at being you than you."

Patrick Malone is a Business Advisor and Leadership Mentor and can be reached at 706 835 1308 or [email protected]

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