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NOV. 1st, 2016


FROM THE PUBLISHER

  • Vet-Advantage Blog Update:  This is a Great Time to Address Those Outdated Veterinary Monitors
    • When's the last time you asked veterinary practices about their monitors? Discuss them now for safety and potential tax savings. Click Here to Read.
  • Price Index Update — Click Here.
  • Quote of the Day

COMPANION

  • Midmark Sodasorb Training Winners Announced
  • Ceva Double Defense Phase 2 Training Winners Announced
  • Bayer’s PAWS: Share the Story campaign raises awareness of domestic violence
  • Sharp increase in pets exposed to marijuana
  • Pets in the workplace bring positives, but also issues to consider
  • Experts create guidelines to help minimize possible disease spread in canine group settings
  • ACVIM Foundation awards oncology grant
  • HABRI awards grant to study impact of animal assisted therapy on clinical echocardiology
  • Veterinary clinic opens in Wal-Mart store
  • Four new cases of West Nile reported in Oklahoma
  • What’s New From Is My Practice Healthy? Management by walking around. Read More

LIVESTOCK

  • Merck Animal Health names Kelly Coulson as Swine Marketing Manager, U.S. Food Animal Marketing
  • New biological treatment could prevent dairy cattle from getting uterine diseases
  • NCC names Mike Popowycs chairman
  • USDA pledges to help small businesses with energy costs
  • Top management areas to increase production in dairy

Sales

  • Pat Malone’s sales tip of the week

Compendium Updates

  • Small Animal Compendium Veterinary Library weekly updates  Click Here
  • Large Animal Compendium Veterinary Library weekly updates  Click Here
Double Defense - Learn More.
Clavamox - Ranked #1 by veterinarians for use and loyalty. Learn More.
VETmedin

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Vet-Advantage Blog Update:  This is a Great Time to Address Those Outdated Veterinary Monitors
When's the last time you asked veterinary practices about their monitors? Discuss them now for safety and potential tax savings. Click Here to Read.

Price Index Update

Quote of the Week
“Growth and comfort never coexist.” – Ginni Rometty, CEO of IBM

Click Here to go Back to Headlines.

COMPANION

Midmark Sodasorb Training Winners Announced
Midmark is pleased to announce the drawing winners of the Sodasorb training initiative. Sodasorb LF – the next generation of CO2 absorbent with safety you can see. There were 12 opportunities for distributor sales reps to win: 2 rep won a $500 e-card, and 10 reps won a $100 e-card. Congratulations to all the winners! Click here to see the list of winners for Midmark Sodasorb.

Ceva Double Defense Phase 2 Training Winners Announced

Ceva is pleased to announce the drawing winners of the Double Defense Phase 2 training initiative. CEVA Vectra® 3D Phase 2, introduced a new Double Defense Heartworm Protocol. There were 74 opportunities for distributor sales reps to win: 2 reps won a $500 e-card, 2 reps won a $250 e-card, and 70 reps won a $50 e-card. Congratulations to all the winners! Click here to see the list of winners for Ceva Double Defense Phase 2.

Bayer’s PAWS: Share the Story campaign raises awareness of domestic violence
According to Pet Product News, Bayer Animal Health aims to help lower the number of animals abused or killed in connection with domestic violence by raising awareness through its PAWS: Share the Story campaign. The campaign supports domestic violence survivors through the donation of $60,000 to three domestic violence shelters across the country that support pets involved in domestic abuse. According to Bayer’s research, almost half of abused women say they are unable to escape abusive living situations because they worry about what will happen to their pets should they leave, abusers use pets as pawns, and too few domestic violence shelters exist nationwide equipped to house and care for pets, resulting in survivors choosing between a life without their pet or a dangerous living situation for both. To learn more and watch a short video about Bayer Animal Health’s PAWS: Share the Story campaign, visit http://www.petandwomensafety.com.

Sharp increase in pets exposed to marijuana
According to the Washington Post, as more jurisdictions legalize marijuana, veterinarians across the country say they are seeing a sharp increase in cases of pets accidentally getting high. Tasty “edibles” such as muffins and cookies that people consume for a buzz are also appealing to animals, who can’t read warning labels, and, in the case of dogs, rarely stop at just one pot brownie. These incidents, which are rarely fatal, have driven a 330 percent increase over the past five years in calls about pets on pot to the Pet Poison Helpline, said Ahna Brutlag, a veterinary toxicologist who is associate director of the Minnesota-based animal poison control center. Two-thirds of the calls involve marijuana edibles, and nearly all involve dogs, she said. Veterinarians also cited examples of chihuahuas lapping up bong water, cats being exposed to vaping, and even rabbits, ferrets and birds getting accidentally stoned.

Pets in the workplace bring positives, but also issues to consider
A recent Chattanooga Times Free Press article examined the rising trend of pets being allowed in the workplace. A survey by the Society for Human Resources Management found that 7 percent of organizations allow pets in the workplace, though that may not reflect the practices of very small businesses that don’t have HR officers. At Badger Maps, owner Steve Benson’s Pomeranian mix, Foxy, seems to know when employees of the San Francisco app developer need some comfort. “They’re very intuitive,” Benson says of dogs. “They have the ability to recognize when someone’s stressed out.” For as many customers that may be charmed, some people are allergic or afraid – and might take their business elsewhere. So besides paying attention to permission from landlords and laws about having animals where food is being prepared, people need to consider how to accommodate uncomfortable staffers or clients. Rodney Alvarez, a human resources executive at Celtra, a video advertising company, says legal issues to consider include making sure the company's insurance covers any incidents like biting, and keeping animals well-behaved so they won't frighten visitors. Read the article at http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/life/entertainment/story/2016/oct/28/pets-work-may-help-atmosphere-bring-risks/394306/.

Experts create guidelines to help minimize possible disease spread in canine group settings
According to AAHA NEWSTat report, veterinary experts from Ohio State University have compiled a user-friendly guide, and paper, to help minimize the possibility of spreading disease in canine group settings. The guidelines were published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. Some of the recommendations include: Dogs with signs of infection should be kept out of group settings; People who touch dogs in group settings should frequently clean their hands; Community surfaces/items should be regularly disinfected, and sharing of balls, toys, etc., avoided; Dogs should have up-to-date vaccinations, especially against highly contagious diseases; Dogs should be kept out of areas that may have ticks, fleas, etc., and rodents and wildlife should be kept of out of areas where dogs will be. For the full guidelines, visit http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/10.2460/javma.249.6.612.

ACVIM Foundation awards oncology grant
The American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) Foundation has awarded funds to Dr. Annette Smith, DVM, DACVIM (Oncology & SAIM) and her collaborators in the Department of Clinical Sciences at Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine to perform research focused on improving diagnosis and prognosis of canine breast cancer through the use of a novel blood test called microRNA. Dr. Smith and her team received a grant totaling $28,458 from the ACVIM Foundation for their study titled, “Circulating MicroRNA as Predictive Biomarkers for Canine Mammary Neoplasia,” which will explore if microRNA can be used to accurately detect cancer cells and also predict how well patients will respond to treatment. Breast cancer is a common cause of death in both women and dogs, and the disease shares characteristics at the genetic level. Circulating microRNA has shown promising early results in human studies, which Dr. Smith and her team are hoping to also achieve with canine patients.

HABRI awards grant to study impact of animal assisted therapy on clinical echocardiology
According to Pet Product News, the Human Animal Bond Research Initiative (HABRI) awarded a $44,000 grant to Duke University School of Medicine’s Division of Pediatric Cardiology for a new research study, “Impact of Animal Assisted Therapy on Quality, Completeness, and Patient and Parental Satisfaction in Children Undergoing Clinical Echocardiography.” This study will examine the influence of Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) on young children undergoing an echocardiogram. It is hypothesized that children will have a more complete and higher-quality echocardiogram in the presence of therapy dogs. In addition, parents are expected to report higher visit satisfaction scores and greater exam comfort for their children.

Veterinary clinic opens in Wal-Mart store
According to VIN News, a walk-in veterinary clinic that opened last month at a Wal-Mart store in western Florida could be the first of a chain of practices leasing space in the superstores. The clinic in Port Richey, called Essentials PetCare, is owned by Dr. Douglas Spiker, a veterinarian, and his wife, Christine Battista. Spiker also is a partner at a six-doctor traditional veterinary clinic, Bluffs Animal Hospital, in Belleair Bluffs, about 30 miles to the south. Spiker said the new clinic is designed to supplement, not supplant, conventional full-service veterinary hospitals. “Our goal is to reach those pet-owning families that don’t go to the veterinarian at all,” he said. “We’re not here to compete with any traditional practice.”

Four new cases of West Nile reported in Oklahoma
According to TheHorse.com, the Equine Disease Communication Center (EDCC) reported Oct. 25 that the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture had four additional West Nile virus (WNV) cases in horses in that state. The EDCC report said the following equids tested positive for the virus: An unvaccinated 8-year-old pony gelding located in Choctaw County showed severe neurologic signs, including leg paralysis, and was euthanized; An unvaccinated yearling Quarter Horse filly from Payne County showed moderate neurologic signs, including hind-limb ataxia; An unvaccinated 16-year-old Quarter Horse gelding in Beckham County showed mild neurologic signs and is recovering; A 7-year-old Quarter Horse gelding located in Atoka County showed severe neurologic signs, including hind-limb paralysis, and was euthanized. That horse’s vaccination history is unknown. The new cases bring Oklahoma’s case total to nine for the year.

What’s New From: Is My Practice Healthy?
Management by walking around

In every business, the people closest to the customer typically have the answers to challenges that may exist. People on the ground, in the warehouse, in the barn, or in the kennel also have the answers to many questions the business needs to answer in order to grow their business. Great leaders put themselves in position frequently to interact with their entire team to get access to the wisdom and answers that are needed to improve the business.  

Read more at http://ismypracticehealthy.com/blog/single/management-by-walking-around 

Click Here to go Back to Headlines.

LIVESTOCK

Merck Animal Health names Kelly Coulson as Swine Marketing Manager, U.S. Food Animal Marketing
Merck Animal Health announced that Kelly Coulson has joined the company as Swine Marketing Manager, U.S. Food Animal Marketing, according to a release. With nearly two decades of sales and retail experience and 15 years of diverse livestock production knowledge, Coulson brings an extensive background in solution selling, husbandry training and customer service. Coulson, who joins Merck from Zoetis, most recently served as a territory business manager for the company’s pork business. He also has considerable experience educating and training producers and caregivers about early disease recognition and intervention, treatment protocols and responsible use of antibiotics.

New biological treatment could prevent dairy cattle from getting uterine diseases
According to Veterinary Practice News, researchers from the University of Florida say that a new biological treatment could prevent dairy cattle from getting uterine diseases. The finding may help with the clinical treatment for animals and improve food safety for people, according to the researchers Kwang Cheol “KC” Jeong, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and Klibs Galvao, DVM, Ph.D., an associate professor in the UF College of Veterinary Medicine. The research was conducted at Alliance Dairy, a commercial farm in Gilchrist County, Fla. The researchers infused chitosan microparticles – an antimicrobial material made of dissolved shrimp shells – into diseased cow uteri. They found that chitosan decreased multiple pathogenic bacteria, including Fusoscobacteria necrophorum, in the uterus and therefore, cured metritis, an inflammation in the uterus. “We did follow-up experiments in animals to cure the disease, which is very important,” Jeong said. “It’s a critical advance because most lab data are not repeated in real-world situations. However, our work showed that chitosan microparticles can be translated into clinical treatment for animals and even for humans.”

NCC names Mike Popowycs chairman
According to MEAT+Poultry, the National Chicken Council announced the installment of Mike Popowycs as its chairman. Popowycs is the vice chairman and chief financial officer of Case Foods, where he was elected to the Troutman, North Carolina-based company’s board of directors in 2005. He has served on the NCC’s board since 2012.

USDA pledges to help small businesses with energy costs
According to Feedstuffs, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced Oct. 25 that the U.S. Department of Agriculture is investing more than $300 million to help hundreds of small businesses across the country save money on their energy costs by adopting renewable energy sources or implementing more efficient options. “Cutting our energy waste is one of the fastest, easiest and cheapest ways to help families save money on their energy bills while reducing harmful carbon pollution. Over the course of nearly eight years, the Obama Administration has taken strong actions to advance energy efficiency in our homes and businesses,” Vilsack said. “Through efficiency upgrades and private-sector partnerships, America has been able to cut its carbon emissions, create jobs and save families hundreds of dollars at the pump and on their utility bills every year.” Vilsack said the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) alone has helped roughly 15,000 rural small businesses, farmers and ranchers improve their bottom lines by installing renewable energy systems and energy efficiency solutions. “When businesses lower their energy costs, they are also able to expand their services and contribute to stronger local economies.”

Top management areas to increase production in dairy
Purina Animal Nutrition conducted an informal survey to discover the management areas dairy farmers are focusing on to reach their goals, according to a release. More than 1,000 dairy farmers voted, and three management areas quickly rose to the top: 1. Facilities and cow comfort; 2. Feeding and nutrition; 3. Calf and heifer raising. Tim Servais, a dairy farmer from Studdard, Wis., who milks 380-cows, cast his vote for feeding and nutrition. He explains, “We recently updated our facilities, and I’ve been pleased with the resulting increase in cow comfort and milk production. Now, I see room for improvement in feeding and nutrition. I’m working closely with my nutritionist to continue my herd’s progress.” Twenty percent of dairy farmers agreed with the vote that Servais cast. The other results show that 20.3 percent felt calf and heifer raising was their next opportunity, 29.1 percent voted for facilities and cow comfort, 13.5 percent herd health and reproduction, 13.5 percent for labor and management, while 3.3 percent felt another factor was their next step to higher milk production. For more information on production, visit www.purinamills.com/dairy-feed 

Click Here to go Back to Headlines.

SALES

Pat Malone’s sales tip of the week

Objections as a positive
Effective leaders think of objections as issues to be answered and resistance as a concern to be managed.

Pat Malone is a senior partner at the Par Group and can be reached at (770) 493-7188 or patrick.malone@thepargroup.com 

COMPENDIUM UPDATES

  • Small Animal Compendium Veterinary Library weekly updates Click Here
  • Large Animal Compendium Veterinary Library weekly updates Click Here

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